Childhood Cancer – How to play your part

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, an annual health campaign organised by major childhood cancer organisations to increase awareness of paediatric cancer and to raise funds for research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure.

Childhood Cancer statistics paint an alarming picture. Studies reveal that childhood and adolescent cancer is threatening to overtake infectious diseases as one of the highest causes of disease-related mortality in children.

In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reported that the worldwide incidence of childhood cancer globally is increasing from 165 000 new cases annually to 215 000 cases for children 14 years and younger and 85 000 new cases for 15 to 19-year-olds.

Mugg & Bean is calling on every South African to support its Muffins for Kids with Cancerinitiative. From 3  September to 3 October, the company will donate  R5 for each giant muffin purchased by customers to Cupcakes of Hope, a non-profit organisation that aims to raise awareness and funds for families in need of medical assistance.

How you can help children with cancer live a better life

Childhood Cancer statistics paint an alarming picture. Studies reveal that childhood and adolescent cancer is threatening to overtake infectious diseases as one of the highest causes of disease-related mortality in children.

In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reported that the worldwide incidence of childhood cancer globally increased from 165 000 new cases annually to 215 000 cases for children 14 years and younger and 85 000 new cases for 15 to 19-year-olds.

According to the Tumour Registry (SACTR), every year, 1 000 children are diagnosed with cancer in South Africa. Sadly, these numbers are not reflective of how many children live with cancer. It is estimated that half of the children with cancer in South Africa are never diagnosed.

Children are failed daily due to misdiagnosis or late diagnosis. By the time children are diagnosed, it is too late and many die from this treatable disease. South Africa has some of the lowest survival rates when it comes to childhood cancers, according to the Childhood Cancer Foundation of South Africa (CHOC). In South Africa, the survival rate for childhood cancer is 50%, compared with 80% in developed countries like the UK.